Arabic Language, Literature & Culture

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Arabic as an International Language for Renaissance: Impact on the Muslim Ummah

Received: 27 June 2022    Accepted: 17 November 2022    Published: 24 February 2023
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Abstract

Arabic, beside being an international language, remains the religious language for more than 2 billion Muslims worldwide, as they use Arabic to recite Quran and to perform the rituals of Islam such as prayers, supplications, spiritual healings, pilgrimage and others. The Glory of Arabic Language is that; The Holy Qur’an has been revealed in Arabic language. Qur’an emphasized in several verses that its’ language of revelation is Arabic language. The prophet of Islam and his companions mastered the arabic literature, learned the Qur’anic wordings alien to them and transmitted the Qur’anic knowledge in thesame language it was revealed. Arabic has influenced many other languages around the globe throughout its history especially languages of Muslim cultures and countries that were conquered by Muslims. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Hindustani (Hindi and Urdu), Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Maldivian, Pashto, Punjabi, Albanian, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Sicilian, Spanish, Greek, Bulgarian, Tagalog, Sindhi, Odia Hebrew and Hausa and some languages in parts of Africa. There are many benefits gained by the Muslim community (Ummah) in learning Arabic language that cuts across the spiritual, moral, and cultural life of every Muslim. Beside these, Arabic is learnt internationally for business and media outreach. Qur’an sciences cannot be studied without understanding the Arabic language: the Arabic language is part of the religion, and knowledge about it is an obligation. Sharia, or Islamic law, offers moral and legal guidance for nearly all aspects of life – from marriage and divorce, to inheritance and contracts, to criminal punishments. This research therefore aims to reposition the role of Arabic as an international language for communication and its corresponding spread along with Islam as Muslims use it for their daily prayers and supplication and for spiritual upliftmement because it is the language of the Qur'an and remains a pillar in world politics and business communication.

DOI 10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11
Published in Arabic Language, Literature & Culture (Volume 8, Issue 1, March 2023)
Page(s) 1-8
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Arabic, International Language, Impact on Muslims, Ummah, Shariah, Qur’an, Hadith, Fiqh

References
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  • APA Style

    Abubakar Yusuf Abdullahi, Isah Zubairu Achara, Mohammad Usman. (2023). Arabic as an International Language for Renaissance: Impact on the Muslim Ummah. Arabic Language, Literature & Culture, 8(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11

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    ACS Style

    Abubakar Yusuf Abdullahi; Isah Zubairu Achara; Mohammad Usman. Arabic as an International Language for Renaissance: Impact on the Muslim Ummah. Arab. Lang. Lit. Cult. 2023, 8(1), 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11

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    AMA Style

    Abubakar Yusuf Abdullahi, Isah Zubairu Achara, Mohammad Usman. Arabic as an International Language for Renaissance: Impact on the Muslim Ummah. Arab Lang Lit Cult. 2023;8(1):1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11,
      author = {Abubakar Yusuf Abdullahi and Isah Zubairu Achara and Mohammad Usman},
      title = {Arabic as an International Language for Renaissance: Impact on the Muslim Ummah},
      journal = {Arabic Language, Literature & Culture},
      volume = {8},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-8},
      doi = {10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.allc.20230801.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.allc.20230801.11},
      abstract = {Arabic, beside being an international language, remains the religious language for more than 2 billion Muslims worldwide, as they use Arabic to recite Quran and to perform the rituals of Islam such as prayers, supplications, spiritual healings, pilgrimage and others. The Glory of Arabic Language is that; The Holy Qur’an has been revealed in Arabic language. Qur’an emphasized in several verses that its’ language of revelation is Arabic language. The prophet of Islam and his companions mastered the arabic literature, learned the Qur’anic wordings alien to them and transmitted the Qur’anic knowledge in thesame language it was revealed. Arabic has influenced many other languages around the globe throughout its history especially languages of Muslim cultures and countries that were conquered by Muslims. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Hindustani (Hindi and Urdu), Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Maldivian, Pashto, Punjabi, Albanian, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Sicilian, Spanish, Greek, Bulgarian, Tagalog, Sindhi, Odia Hebrew and Hausa and some languages in parts of Africa. There are many benefits gained by the Muslim community (Ummah) in learning Arabic language that cuts across the spiritual, moral, and cultural life of every Muslim. Beside these, Arabic is learnt internationally for business and media outreach. Qur’an sciences cannot be studied without understanding the Arabic language: the Arabic language is part of the religion, and knowledge about it is an obligation. Sharia, or Islamic law, offers moral and legal guidance for nearly all aspects of life – from marriage and divorce, to inheritance and contracts, to criminal punishments. This research therefore aims to reposition the role of Arabic as an international language for communication and its corresponding spread along with Islam as Muslims use it for their daily prayers and supplication and for spiritual upliftmement because it is the language of the Qur'an and remains a pillar in world politics and business communication.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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    AB  - Arabic, beside being an international language, remains the religious language for more than 2 billion Muslims worldwide, as they use Arabic to recite Quran and to perform the rituals of Islam such as prayers, supplications, spiritual healings, pilgrimage and others. The Glory of Arabic Language is that; The Holy Qur’an has been revealed in Arabic language. Qur’an emphasized in several verses that its’ language of revelation is Arabic language. The prophet of Islam and his companions mastered the arabic literature, learned the Qur’anic wordings alien to them and transmitted the Qur’anic knowledge in thesame language it was revealed. Arabic has influenced many other languages around the globe throughout its history especially languages of Muslim cultures and countries that were conquered by Muslims. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Hindustani (Hindi and Urdu), Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Maldivian, Pashto, Punjabi, Albanian, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Sicilian, Spanish, Greek, Bulgarian, Tagalog, Sindhi, Odia Hebrew and Hausa and some languages in parts of Africa. There are many benefits gained by the Muslim community (Ummah) in learning Arabic language that cuts across the spiritual, moral, and cultural life of every Muslim. Beside these, Arabic is learnt internationally for business and media outreach. Qur’an sciences cannot be studied without understanding the Arabic language: the Arabic language is part of the religion, and knowledge about it is an obligation. Sharia, or Islamic law, offers moral and legal guidance for nearly all aspects of life – from marriage and divorce, to inheritance and contracts, to criminal punishments. This research therefore aims to reposition the role of Arabic as an international language for communication and its corresponding spread along with Islam as Muslims use it for their daily prayers and supplication and for spiritual upliftmement because it is the language of the Qur'an and remains a pillar in world politics and business communication.
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Author Information
  • Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Prince Abubakar Audu University, Anyigba, Nigeria

  • Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Prince Abubakar Audu University, Anyigba, Nigeria

  • International Talent Outreach, Minna, Nigeria

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